Gears of War 3

Back on the historic day of November 9, 2006, I bought my first Xbox 360 for the sole purpose of “Gears of War,” a game that I vaguely remember story-wise, which is not a good sign when playing a sequel. Fast forward nearly five years later for the dramatic third and final(?) installment, and to be honest this just didn’t do it for me.

Don’t question my opinion by any means while you read this review simply because it’s based on three hours of gameplay.  From the opening menu, if you were like me and decided to skip the second release or both, then you took advantage of the “previously on Gears of War” feature and watched the quick montage of footage and cut-scenes from the first two installments.  It was very well put together and helped me try and focus on just what exactly the objective was.  In “Gears of War 2,” Marcus Fenix and his COG forces were forced to destroy the Jacinto plateau, the last major city on the planet Sera since the appearance of the Locust on Emergence Day seventeen years prior, to flood the Locust tunnels and slow the spread of Lambent (Locust creatures mutated by their exposure to the energic liquid known as Imulsion).  From the opening scene there was an epic, large-scaled battle underway and as soon as the cut-scene was over, BAM! right into the thick of it.

In the seat of Marcus Fenix, you are traversing a sinking cargo ship that has been overrun with Lambent, and Delta squad has to find a way out.  If you are a die hard fan of this series/novels, then this game was your “Ten Commandments” of games, but not mine.  Everything was done surprisingly very well in the game: gameplay, script, voice acting and mini-movies were fantastically produced by the developers.  My personal favorite was controlling Augustus “Cole Train” Cole( voiced by Lester Speight) and his team because some of the one-liners that he was coming up with had me laughing my ass off, but unfortunately a funny cast of characters couldn’t hold my interest past three hours of gameplay.  I found the action sequences boring and repetitive and not at all much of a challenge, despite being on the hardest setting they would allow me to play on without going through it once.  Certain landscape settings let you know, “Hey, get ready, ememies are on the way,” which I’m no fan of at all.  I like the element of surprise and it’s the not-knowing-what’s-going-to-happen-next is what keeps my interest. I will tip my hat to Epic for not disappointing their fans with a mediocre product and not wasting the five month push back on the original release date to create the most anticipated game of 2011, but anyone who is coming into this with a fresh set of eyes may feel kind of lost in translation trying to follow the story.

Some time in the future, I will have to go through all three “Gears” releases, one at a time just to see what all the hype is about.  If you’re someone who’s looking to jump into the “Gears” saga as well, do yourself a favor and start with the first.

Final Verdict for Gears of War 3:

4 out of 5